City of Fairfield, Ohio
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City of Fairfield, Ohio
City of Fairfield offices will be closed for Thanksgiving Holiday on Thursday, November 27 and Friday, November 28

EAB Contacts

Emerald Ash Borer Information - www.emeraldashborer.info

To find a local certified Arborist - www.isa-arbor.com/faca/findArborist.aspx

To report an EAB infestation, contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture by calling toll-free 1- 888-OHIO-EAB, or visit www.ohioagriculture.gov/eab.

For urban forest management assistance, contact the Ohio Division of Forestry at 1-877-247- 8733, or visit www.ohiodnr.com/forestry.

For questions regarding yard trees and pesticide recommendations, read this Fact Sheet or contact the local Ohio State University Extension Office at 513-887-3722.

Emerald Ash Borer Update

Summer 2013 - The media has been predicting the spread of the emerald ash borer (EAB) for several years. Unfortunately, the borer is now having a devastating effect upon Fairfield’s urban forest. Just three years ago, only a few trees were impacted as the insect made its advances into the region. A quarantine that prohibited the transfer of ash firewood slowed the spread of the insects, but did not prevent the inevitable.

The Public Works and Parks Departments are currently updating the most recent street tree inventory, which was completed in 2007. Once the inventory update is complete, the City will develop a plan to address the trees located within the public right-of-way. General information regarding the EAB will be updated periodically on this page.

Larvae             Adult D-Shaped
Exit Hole
S-shaped
Galleries

The larvae (the immature stage) feed on the inner bark of ash trees, disrupting the tree's ability to transport water and nutrients. Adult EAB usually emerge in early May and leave a D-shaped exit hole, approximately 1/8 of an inch in size, in the bark. Other signs of an infested tree include die-back of the crown (top of the tree), sprouts or sucker development on the lower part of the tree, vertical splits in the tree’s bark and S-shaped galleries under the bark. The result is death of the ash tree in three to five years, leaving a potential public hazard. Without treatment a borer infestation has proven to be 100% fatal.

Homeowners should closely monitor the ash trees on their property this spring for the signs of EAB. Ash tree owners may choose to chemically treat their ash to prevent an EAB infestation or proactively remove all ash. Whether treating or removing a tree, the City strongly recommends using trained professionals who have achieved, and maintain, certification with the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). These professionals should also provide proof of insurance and workers’ comp before beginning any work.

 

BEWARE: Emerald Ash Borer Scams Reported

Cincinnati area residents have fallen victim to a scam in which they are informed by an alleged tree company that the trees on their property is infected by the Emerald Ash Borer. Usually, the property owner is approached with some urgency to remove the affected trees. In some cases, a full payment in the thousands of dollars has been reported. In other cases, a significant deposit is made on the work.

The City does not recommend specific arborists or tree care companies. The City strongly recommends using trained professionals who have achieved, and maintain, certification with the International Society of Arboriculture. A search engine for finding arborists with these credentials is available at www.isa-arbor.com. Residents are strongly encouraged to only work with tree companies who have shown proof of workers compensation and insurance.

Respect Quarantines: Don’t Move Firewood

Ohio Department of Agriculture’s (ODA) has issued a quarantine prohibiting the movement of all nonconiferous firewood, ash trees and all parts of ash trees from being moved out of quarantined areas. As of September 2010, all 88 counties in Ohio have been quarantined. The quarantine stipulates that ash materials and hardwood firewood cannot be taken from a quarantined area into a non-quarantined area. Despite the fact that quarantining the whole state will allow for ease of movement of ash materials and hardwood firewood, it is recommended that Ohioans continue to exercise caution when moving these materials. The Ohio Department of Agriculture strongly urges Ohioans to buy firewood locally.

City of Fairfield
Parks & Recreation
411 Wessel Drive
Fairfield, OH 45014
(513) 867-5348 (phone)
(513) 867-6070 (fax)
parks@fairfield-city.org

Hours of Operation:
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 8:00 pm
Saturday
9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed